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A sense of competition must be inbred as part of our primitive instinct to achieve predominance, because all of us have it. Most think of competition as trying to best a person or team. But what if we lived alone on an island? Would our sense of competition diminish? Would we only be consumed with survival? No, because as humans our propensity is to create value. Our loftiest tendency is not to survive, or to compare ourselves with anyone else (as it is with competition). Our loftiest instinct is to do better, to be somebody. Unlike animals, if alone on.

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  When you meet people for the first time, what’s the first thing you do? Is it to evaluate the people and think, “Hmm, he looks unfriendly” or “She doesn't like my type” or  “That group is out of my league, I'd better avoid them.” If you think this way, then you're judging people based on personal bias, not necessarily reality.  The same applies to how we judge our own appearance. If you shop for clothes by designer label, go out to be seen in the hottest places in town, drive the latest status car—you’re spending money to impress people. Is it worth.

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  Debra sat before her manager in tears. After almost two weeks of sales training, she could no longer bear the pressures. Debra passed her tests, she even excelled at some presentations, but she didn’t participate much with the class, and worst of all, after she stood outside an Operating Room to witness a procedure, she nearly fainted. Her apparent frailties portended poorly for her potential success as a surgical sales representative in one of the most challenging territories in the U.S.—New York City. “Maybe this is not the right fit for you,” her manager said. “I can do this,”.

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  Unsettledness naturally follows change, and we begin asking saying something like, “Did I make the right decision?” or “This isn’t what I wanted.” Emotions fluctuate between excitement and fear, between joy and unhappiness. All of these reactions only prove that we are human.  Change has become the norm today, and a human response is exactly what's needed to produce effective change leadership into the future. You would think that by now we would have perfected the art of change.  Yet according to a 2013 Strategy&/Katzenbach Center survey of global senior executives on culture and change management, the success rate.

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Self-confident people are admired by others, and yet many of us struggle with staying confident in a negative world. Unlike those who succumb to disparagement, self-confident persons confront their fears and rejections straightaway.  They tend to be risk takers. They understand that no matter what obstacles may arise, they have the ability to overcome them. Self-confident people tend to think with a positive, can-do attitude even when confronted with unexpected challenges. Now, who wouldn't want that kind of self-confidence each day? If you don’t fit that description, the good news is you can learn to be self-confident.  Self-confidence can be developed through learning and practice -.

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If you drop a frog in a pot of boiling water, it will instantly try to climb out. However…if you gently place it in a pot of lukewarm water and turn the heat on low, it will float there calmly. As the water gradually heats up, the frog is unaware of its deadly changing environment and before long it boils to death. Many of us have been like that boiling frog - too afraid to jump out of a bad situation. So we simmer until we eventually succumb to a toxic environment. One of my biggest regrets in my corporate.

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  “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” – Winston Churchill You’ve received a mostly positive review, with one criticism that ruins your day and sticks with you months later. Sound familiar? As humans we tend to accentuate the negatives. Psychologists call it negativity bias. Our selective memory harbors negative encounters more than positive ones because they provoke more intense reactions, which makes us more timid and less willing to take risks. Thankfully, we can take steps to overcome our negative propensity so we can escape the disease of pessimism without.

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Isabelle left a voice mail on her friend’s answering machine. “I need to talk! I am in trouble!” After retrieving the message, her friend ran down the backstairs of their apartment complex and pounded on Isabelle’s door. Isabelle pulled the door open and smiled, a drift of cinnamon wafted from the mouth of the coffee cup in her hand. “What’s the crisis?” her breathless friend asked. “I saw a picture of Martin and it triggered every hurtful emotion,” Isabelle answered. “That was three years ago!” her friend said, not a little perturbed. What do you think is Isabelle’s problem? It’s.

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Money, or the lack of it, can cause tremendous stress, whether at home or in your business - especially this time of year when buying gifts. If you're a baby boomer or generation x'er you might be surprised that millennials are better at managing their finances than your generation. When compared to baby boomers, people between the ages of 18 and 33 were more likely to track expenses and stick to a budget, a 2015 survey by T. Rowe Price found. Sixty-seven percent of young people follow a budget, compared to 55% of boomers. And still 30% of young people.

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“On your mark, get set, go!” With that send-off, Ida and her fellow competitors began racing to the finish line along the asphalt track. All the racers finished except Ida, who hardly moved an inch. The judge instantly declared Ida as the last-place finisher—the loser—and poor Ida lived most of her life thinking she was a failure. Then one day someone placed Ida in a pool to compete. Ida won!—because Ida was actually a water turtle. Ida, like all of us, was uniquely designed to function for a purpose, but only if fitted in the right place. Our singularity makes.

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